For Tehuti

gil scott heron

Gil Scott-Heron

Every time I play a Gil Scot-Heron I remember the first time I heard about him. I was living on Irvine Hall, Block A , maybe second or final year at U.W.I. I met Tehuti and Abidan, it was Abidan who had met Ramonia and then he introduced his “cousin” Tehuti to me and Keisha and Sabriya . Tehuti and Abidan used to come visit Ramonia some evenings on Hall and we would all kinda hang out in Ramonia’s room. I became friends with Tehuti and we used to reason. In one our reasonings he asked me about Gil Scott Heron. I think he just asked me if i knew him or he said i should go and check out the artist. I can’t remember, but T was the reason i added Gil Scott-Heron to my music collection. I remember downloading “The Revolution will not be televised” and “Angel Dust”.

Every time I listen to Gil Scott-Heron I discover a little bit more about him and I remember T.

We didn’t really stay in touch when he migrated to the United States.  I saw him once when he came back to visit.

On that visit he asked me if I had ever heard of “Midnite”. I had never heard of them but as soon as i got a chance I was looking for Midnite. I downloaded as much of their music as I could find.

In fact three “Midnite” albums kept my company during my first winter, while i  was studying in England.  I would pad up and head to the University of Surrey listening the Ainshant Maps, Seek Knowledge before Vengeance and Unpolished. I don’t think i would love them as much if it wasn’t for T.

T transitioned to “the other side” some years ago”.  The music he left me keeps his memory alive everyday.  Give Thanks Tehuti…..

Footnote.

Gilbert “Gil” Scott-Heron (April 1, 1949 – May 27, 2011) was an American soul and jazz poet musician, and author known primarily for his work as a spoken word performer in the 1970s and ’80s, and for his collaborative works with musician Brian Jackson. His collaborative efforts with Jackson featured a musical fusion of jazz, blues, and soul, as well as lyrical content concerning social and political issues of the time, delivered in both rapping and melismatic vocal styles by Scott-Heron. His own term for himself was “bluesologist”, which he defined as “a scientist who is concerned with the origin of the blues”. The music of his albums, most notably Pieces of a Man and Winter in America in the early 1970s, influenced and helped engender later African-American music genres such as hip hop and neo soul. ( source http://vintagefunkphotos.blogspot.com/)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About dj afifa

I am a selecta. I make sound projects and i make spaces inspired by music.

One comment

  1. I really love Gil Scott Heron – felt so terribly sad when he died. He was incredibly influential. I wrote about him (and Geronimo Pratt) here, a few years ago: https://petchary.wordpress.com/2011/06/12/real-revolutionaries/

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